The art of airflow.

Good afternoon again friends, I’m getting a lot of blogging done today that has been built up on my “to do” list for a few weeks. I’m sorry that I’m hitting you all at once, but I found some time to get my typing done today.

Recently, I was working on a 13″ MacBook Pro (Unibody) that was sent into us damaged. Of course we can repair this; however in this particular case the customer asked us NOT repair fix the “cosmetic” damage and just work on the electronics.

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Here’s what I found out about this unit. As Forrest Gump might have put it, “Fluids is as fluids does.” Thinking of liquids helps us understand how air flows. For all general purposes, air flows just like water. Flow will inevitably follow the path of least resistance. That means the flow will usually take the shortest, unrestricted path from the point of high pressure to the low pressure area.

Take this “cosmetic damage” for instance. Yes, we can repair this unit and leave the “dents” in the side of the unit. However when I tested it, the fans that cool the logic board were turning on pre-maturely. Most of the air was being pushed out of this “cosmetic” hole in the side of the computer, rather than through the vents on the back which ensures that the air flows OVER the logic board and CPU to keep it cool, rather than AROUND it.

Why was this unit failing? It’s because the fans were not able to keep the internal components of the computer cool enough to operate under specifications and therefore overheating.

This is just a friendly post to keep in mind that these devices are meant to be “whole” when operated, and that the art of airflow applies to your expensive electronics, there’s no doubt about that.

Take care, Ryan

The truth about MacBook Pro Keyboard Repairs.

Hello there friends,

We get calls at Mission Repair constantly for MacBook Pro Repairs; it’s something that we’ve been doing for 8 years, and I’ve been personally working on Macs for about 19 years. I can attest that the newer the Mac, the harder they are becoming to service.

For example:

We replace keyboards on MacBook Pro laptops. If you’ve ever seen one, or ever used one, you may notice the the keyboard is mounted from under the palmrest, which is different than most PC laptops. Most “Windows Machines” have keyboards that are mounted from the top and can simply be replaced with a couple of screw turns and a cable.

Not on some MacBook Pro computers. In fact, here’s the pile of miniature screws that need to be removed just to simply remove the keyboard from the laptop:

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Somewhere near 60 screws. Plus, you can only get to it by removing the bottom case, hard drive, optical drive, logic board, battery all related cabling and some brackets. I’ve heard some of my technicians stating that it’s taken them 1.5 hours, but I did it in 47 minutes start to finish. Now, we don’t charge much for this repair and I wanted to share that this is not an easy task, but as a technician “too many screws” just can’t be in our vocabulary! We may think that “this is all screwed up”, or sometimes we might want to say “screw this”, but those are all just jokes!

A bit of advice: don’t spill anything on your keyboard, you can avoid the repair altogether!

Take care, Ryan

Ok, so this is a bad situation.

Good morning again friends,

We took a repair in at our Olathe, Kansas location that was in “serious” need this morning. Mission Repair is here to help.

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I feel terrible for this customer that got their top case caught in a piece of machinery that “crunched” the entire screen assembly. It’s kind of a nightmare to look at, but once we’re done, the customer will never know the difference.

This brings us to our full line of Mac laptop repairs. I’ve personally been servicing Mac laptops for just about 20 years. I’ll admit that I am a little rusty because I have technicians on hand to handle the day to day work flow 😉 But I can still hold my own in the tech room!

As the technology gets better, the units get faster, the styling sleeker – but the importance of each unit remains- these are valuable to our customers, and we’re happy to provide a solution to get them back to “normal” again.

We’ve got the screen assembly on order and it’ll arrive soon; I’ll follow up with the completed repair once it his our QA department.

Thanks, talk to you again soon. Ryan